Cardiology Grand Rounds

Date: 
October 23, 2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Event Location: 
Sarver Heart Center
Event Location Other: 
Room 4137

Inspiratory Muscle Training Mitigates Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea, presented by University of Arizona Associate Professor Fiona Bailey, PhD

Dr. Bailey's research focus is the neural control of breathing in human and nonhuman mammals. The first of her publications in this area assessed the role of pulmonary stretch receptors and central chemoreceptors in the genesis and relief of dyspnea or shortness of breath in healthy adults. These studies led to studies in the mammalian (rodent) airway that explored the modulation of upper airway muscles activities by chemical and pulmonary afferent feedback and the potential for selective electrical stimulation of the cranial nerve XII to alter airway geometry and volume (NIH/NIDCD RO3).

Beginning in 2005, with the support of an NIH/NIDCD K23, Dr. Bailey began work in neural control of upper airway muscles using tungsten microelectrodes to record from single motor units in adult human subjects. This work led in turn, to studies of regional (or segmental) muscle and motor unit activities in human subjects under volitional, state-dependent (i.e., wake/sleep) and chemoreceptor drives, in health and disease (NIH/NIDCD RO1).  

On the basis of the experimental work in muscle and motor units, Dr. Bailey pursued additional lines of enquiry focused on clinical respiratory dysfunction in two specific populations a) infants at risk for SIDS and b) adults diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Both lines of enquiry are highly innovative and have immediate diagnostic and clinical applications.  One such line of enquiry explores the potential for a non-pharmacologic intervention daily to lower blood pressure and to improve sleep in patients diagnosed with mild-moderate obstructive sleep apnea.  This training protocol shows promise as a cheap, effective and safe means of lowering blood pressure and improving autonomic-cardiovascular dysfunction in patients who are unwilling or unable to use the standard CPAP therapy.