General Cardiology

Julia H. Indik, MD, PhD

Personal Information
Professor of Medicine
Flinn Foundation and American Heart Association Endowed Chair in Electrophysiology
Director, Cardiovascular Disease Fellowship Program
Graduate, UA Cardiovascular Disease Fellowship Program 2002
(520) 626-1416
jindik@shc.arizona.edu

Julia H. Indik, MD, PhD, is a professor of medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. She completed her undergraduate work at Princeton University and then continued at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she received her doctorate in physics.  She moved to Tucson 1986 to work at Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona as a postdoctoral research associate.

However, she decided to change career directions and enrolled in the College of Medicine where she earned her MD in 1996 and continued in the Department of Medicine to complete internship and residency training.  She received her cardiology fellowship training at the University of Arizona and followed with a year of electrophysiology fellowship training which she completed in June of 2003. She is the holder of the Flinn Foundation and American Heart Association Endowed Chair in Electrophysiology and is the Director of the Cardiology Fellowship Program.

Her current research involves the study of waveform characteristics of ventricular fibrillation and its relationship to heart failure and myocardial infarction in the context of resuscitation research with Dr. Karl Kern. She is also involved in image analysis of right ventricular wall motion with respect to arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, with Dr. Frank Marcus. Dr. Indik is also the ECG section editor for the American Journal of Medicine. She is involved in various activities of the American College of Cardiology and is the chair of the Training Material Development Committee that is responsible for the national fellows in service examination. She is also actively involved with the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society in committees that include the development of professional education activities and clinical consensus statements and guidelines.

Read about how Dr. Indik's Childhood Longing for Space Adventure Led to a Career in Cardiology

For physician clinical appointments, please call Karla Ramirez, 520-694-6482.

For Dr. Indik's academic office and other information, please call 520-626-8615.

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

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Mark J. Friedman, MD

Personal Information
Professor of Medicine
Thomas and Sabina Sullivan, Sr. Endowed Chair for the Prevention and Treatment of Heart Failure
Graduate, UA Cardiovascular Disease Program 1978
(520) 626-2477
mfriedman@shc.arizona.edu

Mark J. Friedman, MD, is clinical professor of medicine and The Thomas and Sabina Sullivan, Sr. Endowed Chair for the Prevention and Treatment of Heart Failure. He obtained his medical doctorate from New York Medical College where he graduated Alpha Omega Alpha. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY. After two years of active duty with the United States Air Force, Dr. Friedman completed his cardiology fellowship at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center. He also completed a research fellowship in clinical pharmacology and cardiac ultrasound before joining the cardiology faculty at The University of Arizona Health Sciences Center. Dr. Friedman then pursued a career in clinical practice of cardiology including clinical cardiology, invasive and non-invasive cardiology, interventional cardiology, and pacemakers and defibrillators, before rejoining the faculty in his current position.

Dr. Friedman is board certified in both internal medicine and cardiovascular disease. He is a fellow of the Council on Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. Dr. Friedman has been listed in Best Doctors in America (Cardiology). His main interest is in clinical cardiology and medical education.

For physician appointment information, please call 520-MyHeart (694-3278).

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

Paul E. Fenster, MD

Personal Information
Associate Professor of Medicine
Graduate, UA Cardiovascular Disease Program 1979
(520) 626-3766
pfenster@email.arizona.edu

Paul E. Fenster, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine.  A native of New York, Dr. Fenster graduated cum laude from Brandeis University in 1970.  He received his medical training at the State University of New York, Health Sciences Center at Brooklyn.  After completing his internship in Internal Medicine at Brooklyn in 1975, he moved to Tucson.  Following his residency in Internal Medicine at The University of Arizona College of Medicine, he completed a Cardiology Clinical Fellowship and Research Fellowship at The University of Arizona.  He was a recipient of an American Heart Association Clinician-Scientist Award from 1980 to 1985 for the study of pharmacokinetic and dynamic effects of cardiac drugs.

Dr. Fenster received the Cardiology Fellowship Teaching Award in 1993,1998, and 2000.

Dr. Fenster is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology.  He is past President of the Arizona Affiliate of the American Heart Association, past President of the Southern Arizona Division of the American Heart Association, and past chairman of the Arizona Heart Association Research Advisory
Committee.

He has authored over 41 original research publications, 35 book chapters, and 55 clinical reviews.

For physician appointment information, please call 520-MyHeart (694-3278).

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

Steven Goldman, MD

Personal Information
Professor of Medicine
goldmans@email.arizona.edu

Steven Goldman, MD, is Professor of Medicine at the UA Sarver Heart Center. A native of Ohio, he received his undergraduate education at Cornell University and his Medical Doctorate from The University of Cincinnati Medical School. His residency training was at The University of Illinois, The University of Chicago and Stanford University. He received his cardiology training at the Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, California. He came to The University of Arizona in 1975 from California. He was Chief of Cardiology at the Southern Arizona VA Health System and now is full time at the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center.

Dr. Goldman’s clinical research has focused on graft patency (evaluating the openness of arteries) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). He has been the principle investigator and co-investigator on a number of large VA multicenter studies that defined the appropriate use of aspirin for vein graft patency after CABG.  He is currently completing a long-term trial defining radial artery graft patency after CABG.

Dr. Goldman’s work in the laboratory focuses on cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology. To this end, he has been investigating cell-based therapy for heart failure using stem cells seeded on a biodegradable patch as treatment for heart failure. He and Jordan Lancaster, PhD, founded Avery Therapeutics, a biotechnology start-up company that is a spin off from the University of Arizona to commercialize this idea.

Dr. Goldman has won numerous awards for teaching over the years. In 2008, Dr. Goldman was named the Founders Day Speaker at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson. This award is given each year to a faculty member with a long successful research career at the University of Arizona. In 2010, he was awarded the Charles W. Hall, Jr. Memorial Cardiology Fellowship Teaching Award. His research laboratory has received funding from the Sarver Heart Center, the Tech Launch Arizona, the Veterans Administration, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, the Arizona Biomedical Research Commission, the biotechnology industry, and private foundations. His laboratory has supported the development of several young investigators.

For physician appointment information, please call 520-MyHeart (694-3278).

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

Eric A. Brody, MD

Personal Information
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine; Director of Clinical Services and Associate Director, Native American Cardiology Program
(520) 694-7000
Eric.Brody@bannerhealth.com

Eric A. Brody, MD, is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Cardiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine. In July 2010, he began his current position with Banner- University Medical Center, University of Arizona as the Medical Director of the Native American Cardiology-Medical Services Program. Previously, he served as the Director of Clinical Services and  Associate Director of the Native American Cardiology Program, a collaborative program of the Indian Health Service, University of Arizona Medical Center for 15 years, also at UMC.    

He obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology at Yale University and his medical degree from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His internship and residency in Internal Medicine were completed at The University of Massachusetts Medical Center. He returned to Philadelphia and completed his cardiology training at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He also served as a Commander in the Commission Corp of the U.S. Public Health Services during his IHS tenure. Dr. Brody is board certified in Cardiovascular Diseases in 1995 and again in 2005. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. 

His research interests include the incidence and prevalence of coronary artery disease in Native Americans, as well as cardiac risk factors in these populations. He has presented results of his research at IHS scientific meetings as well as meetings of the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology. He has co-authored over  20 articles, abstracts and other publications. Dr. Brody’s special interests include community interventions aimed at improving care for, and awareness of, myocardial infarction in the Native Americans. His primary research work has been in time-to-treatment issues in Native American patients with acute as well as clinical outcomes in this population. He is the principal investigator of the NATIVE study (Native American Time-to-Treatment Intervention Evaluation), a multi-year ongoing evaluation of myocardial infarction in Native people. He also serves as the primary coordinator of clinic visits to Indian Health Service Facilities for the Sarver Heart Center.

Dr. Brody has received numerous awards including the Tucson Area IHS Director’s Merit Award (2004 and 2007), the Phoenix Area Director’s Award for Excellence, the Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service and the Public Health Service Achievement Medal. In 2004, Dr. Brody was named IHS Physician of the Year. In 2006-2012, Dr. Brody has been named as one of “America’s Best Physicians”.

His personal interests center on his family, reading and athletics, both as stress relief and as an example to his patients. He is an avid runner, biker and a wet-behind-the-ears swimmer. He is a member of the U.S. Masters Swimming Association and completed a number of half-marathons as well as sprint and olympic distance triathlons. 

Joseph Stephen Alpert, MD

Personal Information
Professor of Medicine
(520) 626-3766
jalpert@shc.arizona.edu

Joseph Stephen Alpert, MD, professor of medicine at the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, came to the University of Arizona from the University of Massachusetts in Worcester where he served as the Edward Budnitz Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and director, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine as well as vice-chairman of Medicine.

A native of Connecticut, Dr. Alpert obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree (Magna Cum Laude) from Yale University where he was elected to Sigma Xi and Phi Beta Kappa. He obtained his Medical Doctorate (Cum Laude) from Harvard Medical School where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. In 1967, he was awarded the Gold Medal of the University of Copenhagen for excellence in a scientific thesis. Dr. Alpert did his internal medicine residency and cardiovascular disease training at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, a teaching hospital of the Harvard Medical School, and was a research fellow of the Massachusetts Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health. Following his fellowship, Dr. Alpert became a staff cardiologist and director of the Coronary Care Unit at the Naval Regional Medical Center in San Diego and an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Following his military service, he returned to Harvard Medical School and was appointed as assistant professor of medicine and director of the Samuel A. Levine Cardiac Unit, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

In 1978, Dr. Alpert joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts as professor and chief of the Section of Cardiovascular Medicine. In 1992, he was appointed the Robert S. and Irene P. Flinn Professor of Medicine and Chair, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, a position that he held until 2006.

Dr. Alpert is board certified in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Dr. Alpert has received many teaching awards during his career including the Edward Rhodes Stitt Award for Outstanding Teaching at the Naval Regional Medical Center in San Diego, the George W. Thorn Award for Excellence in Teaching at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Outstanding Teaching Awards at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in 1981, 1987, 1989, and 1990, and at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2006.  In 1990 he received the William Osler Master Teacher Award and in 1993, the William Harvey Master Teaching Award both from the University of Miami School of Medicine. In 1994, he received an Excellence in Teaching Award from the Mt. Sinai Medical School in New York City. In 1998, he was named Clinical Sciences Educator of the Year by the graduating medical student class at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Dr. Alpert received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Clinical Cardiology Council of the American Heart Association in 2001. In 2004, he was selected as the Gifted Teacher of the Year by the American College of Cardiology “in recognition of his significant contribution to cardiovascular education and the training of professionals in cardiovascular disease”.

Dr. Alpert has been a member of the American Heart Association since 1971. He is also a fellow of the Council on Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association and a past chairman of this council, and a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, the European Society of Cardiology and a master of the American College of Physicians (he is a past-president of the Society of Geriatric Cardiology). He has served on many national committees of these organizations. He is an honorary member of the Danish Cardiovascular Society, the Argentina Cardiology Association, and the Israeli Heart Society. Dr. Alpert is a former member of the Board of Trustees of the American College of Cardiology and the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine. He currently sits on the board of trustees of the Association of Professors of Medicine. Dr. Alpert is the former editor of the journals Cardiology, Current Cardiology Reports, and Cardiology in Review. Currently, he serves as the editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Medicine. He is a member of the editorial board of 10 internal medicine and cardiovascular journals. He is the author of 48 books and monographs, and 650 publications including more than 200 original scientific publications, more than 400 book chapters, review articles, and editorials, and more than 100 abstracts. Dr. Alpert lives in Tucson, Arizona. In the past, Dr. Alpert has team taught a course entitled Literature and Medicine. Dr. Alpert has two children, a daughter, Eva, who is a tax attorney in Boston, Massachusetts, and a son, Niels, who is a director and cinematographer in Hollywood, California. 

For physician appointment information, please call 520-MyHeart (694-3278).

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

Gordon A. Ewy, MD

Personal Information
Professor Emeritus of Cardiology; Director Emeritus of Sarver Heart Center
GAEWY1933@gmail.com

Gordon A. Ewy, MD, is professor emeritus of medicine (cardiology) and director emeritus of the Sarver Heart Center at the University Of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson AZ. He occupied the Gordon A. Ewy, M.D. Distinguished Endowed Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine from 2002 to 2013.

As a founding member of cardiology in 1969 and Chief of the Section of Cardiology from 1982-2010 he has been integral to the development of clinical and research programs that have resulted in the Cardiovascular Services at University of Arizona College of Medicine being a peer of the nation’s better academic institutions. As the previous director, the Cardiology Fellowship Program has graduated over 100 fellows as trained cardiologists as of 2009.

Heading the Sarver Heart Center since 1991, Dr. Ewy directed the fundraising for the Sarver Heart Center building, dedicated in 2000, and oversaw its design and construction. In addition, he has spearheaded fundraising efforts to establish and foster endowments for academic positions in the College of Medicine and to support the research of Sarver Heart Center members. The Sarver Heart Center is now home to 13 endowed chairs, 2 endowed fellowships, 3 endowed professorships, and 2 future endowed chairs set up by annuities. 

In the area of research, Dr. Ewy has made significant contributions to defibrillation and resuscitation of patients with cardiac arrest. He brought together experts from various departments to form the Sarver Heart Center Resuscitation Research Group. Their development of a new approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation for primary cardiac arrest, called Cardiocerebral Resuscitation, has been shown to dramatically improve the survival rate in patients suffering witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This new approach consists of a community, pre-hospital, and hospital components. The Community component begins at the scene with bystander-initiated chest compression only CPR (CO-CPR) and continues with a modified protocol used by paramedics (pre-hospital component) and most recently the hospital component where therapeutic hypothermia, early cardiac catheterization and other aspects for therapy of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome are available. The result has been doubling or tripling survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in each area in which Cardiocerebral Resuscitation has been introduced.

For his early contributions to defibrillation and resuscitation Dr. Ewy was designated as an American Heart Association Honoree by the International Conference on Guidelines for Emergency Cardiac Care in 2001—a position referred to as a “CPR Giant” and held by only a few individuals in the world.

Dr. Ewy’s other research accomplishments include contributions in the areas of digoxin metabolism and the hemodynamic correlates of cardiovascular physical findings. Together with Frank I. Marcus, MD, he described the pharmacokinetics of digoxin in the elderly and in the obese, contributing to safer use of this cardiovascular drug.

His long interest in clinical cardiology and clinical research led him to clarify the normal jugular venous pulsations and to describe the hemodynamic significance of the Hepatojugular Reflux (HJR), a term he changed to the more accurate “Abdominal Jugular Test.”

His interest in cardiovascular physical examination and teaching led Dr. Ewy to collaborate with Michael S. Gordon, MD, PhD, of The University of Miami, to develop the teaching material and multimedia computer-assisted instructional material that accompanies the teaching mannequin “Harvey.”  The device was named after their mentor during their fellowship at Georgetown University, W. Proctor Harvey. Harvey (the cardiology patient simulator) has been validated as an educational tool in a multi-medical school study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Ewy had a busy practice and consultative cardiology service at the University Hospital (now Banner- University Medical Center) since its opening in 1971. He has been listed in the Best Doctors in America database every year since the list was first published.

Dr. Ewy is dedicated to educating the public in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. He is convinced that lay individuals, medical students, residents, fellows and physicians in private practice need to keep up with the ever changing developments in cardiovascular medicine. To disseminate medical information among lay individuals, he established the Sarver Heart Center Newsletter, a free and regular publication, which includes “Heart News for You” a series explaining basic concepts and addressing new research in cardiovascular medicine.  Dr. Ewy has organized and participated in countless Sarver Heart Center public education programs throughout Arizona. He is active in training medical students, residents, and fellows and has directed several post-graduate education programs for private practice community. Those best known were the 13 year series of post-graduate programs on “Cardiovascular Emergencies,” held at the national American College of Cardiology headquarters in Washington, DC follow by another 13 year series of cardiology update courses, called “A Weekend at the Waldorf” held at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York. He was also one of the co-directors of the annual post-graduate series of “Tutorials in the Tetons” courses for practicing physicians. He directed the American College of Cardiology’s first international satellite teleconference, “Congestive Heart Failure – 2000.” For his frequent engagements in post-graduate in medical education, Dr. Ewy received the award, “Best Contributions in Continuing Medical Education” from The University of Arizona College of Medicine.

Dr. Ewy is the author or co-author of four books and over 274 publications listed in PubMed.

He obtained his Bachelor of Arts and Medical Doctorate from The University of Kansas where he graduated Alpha Omega Alpha (medical student honor society). He completed his internship and first-year medical residency at the Georgetown University Division of the District of Columbia General Hospital, a 1,400-bed indigent hospital. He spent his second year of residency and his cardiology fellowship training at Georgetown University and was on the faculty of Georgetown University School of Medicine for four years before coming to the then new University of Arizona College of Medicine in 1969. Certified in both Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease, Dr. Ewy is a past member of the Cardiovascular Disease Sub-specialty Board of the American Board of Internal Medicine. In this position, he was one of ten cardiologists to write the American Board of Internal Medicine subspecialty examination for board certification and re-certification in cardiovascular disease.

After college, Dr. Ewy served as an Ensign and as a Lieutenant Junior Grade on active duty aboard the U.S.S. Begor APD 127. He is fond of pointing out that 40 percent of the population of his home town are physicians—his older brother Gene and himself. The “town” in western Kansas called “Brenham” consisted of a wheat elevator managed by his father, a filling station that his mother ran and one house. His oldest brother, Dale, an electronics engineer, built the world’s first sophisticated defibrillator tester, which Dr. Ewy used in his early defibrillation research. Unfortunately, at that time, neither of them had the $500 required to patent the device.

Dr. Ewy says his most important accomplishment was convincing Priscilla Ruth Welbon, whom he met while in the U.S. Navy, to marry him. They met when she was 18 and he 21 years of age. After three years of letter writing, they were engaged via a trans-Pacific telephone call. Following his first year of medical school, she returned from overseas and they were married. He says his next most important accomplishment was keeping her from divorcing him once he became “married” to his career. Says Dr. Ewy: “She has been an invaluable partner in my life and in my work – she has edited almost every page that I published!” They have two living children, Gordon Stuart and Mark Allen. They have three grandchildren. Dr. Ewy retired June 30, 2013, after Priscilla told him, “At 80 years of age, it is time!” He continues to write and lecture to push for the adoption of Cardiocerebral Resuscitation for primary cardiac arrest world-wide, to travel, and spend more time with the grandchildren.

For physician appointment information, please call 520-MyHeart (694-3278).

For more health information, please visit our Heart Health page.

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