In The News

Does race influence decision-making for advanced heart failure therapies?

11/11/2019

“African-American race negatively influenced the decision-making process for heart transplants, especially during discussions among health care providers,” said lead author Khadijah Breathett, MD, MS, an assistant professor of medicine and advanced heart failure/transplant cardiologist at the University of Arizona’s Sarver Heart Center. “Since advanced therapy selection meetings are conversations rather than surveys, race may contribute significantly to treatment recommendations.”


Black Girls Rock, so Why the Health Disparities?

09/09/2019

Dr. Khadijah Breathett, assistant professor of medicine at UA College of Medicine - Tucson and Sarver Heart Center, reported that black women in the U.S. have the highest rate of high blood pressure compared to other racial/ethnic groups and sexes; also women receive fewer heart transplants despite having higher rates of heart failure.


Erika Yee featured in Teachers, staff not required to learn life-saving procedure

08/26/2019

While Arizona requires high school students to learn CPR, it doesn't require teachers to be trained. Erika Yee, University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center health education assistant, tells her story of saving the life of a bandmate in high school and informs people about the training resources available on UA Sarver Heart Center's "Learn CPR" webpage: https://heart.arizona.edu/heart-health/learn-cpr


Prediabetes: The 84 Million-Person Health Risk

08/09/2019

In the United States, 84 million people, 1 in 3 adults, have prediabetes and 9 out of 10 are unaware. That is more than 76 million people who could take steps to reduce their risks, if only they knew, writes Kelly Palmer, MHS, CCRP, in a Healthy Dose blog.


Making CPR Training Accessible for Underserved Communities

08/05/2019

Erika Yee, Sarver Heart Center's health education assistant, has taught chest-compression-only CPR to more than 4,500 people during the 2018-2019 academic year. She also made training materials more accessible by collaborating with other organizations. These include materials in Spanish and American Sign Language.


Genetic Approaches to Cardiomyopathy, Dr. Jil Tardiff

07/31/2019

BCVS Council Vice Chair Beth McNally and BCVS 2019 Co-Chair Jil Tardiff interview Keynote Lecturer Christine Seidman about her recent work on the genetics of dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and how it might be harnessed to develop new, earlier treatments.


Dr. Nancy Sweitzer honored as one of Tu Nidito's Remarkable Moms

05/07/2019

Dr. Nancy Sweitzer, who coped with the death of her husband, Kurt, while raising two children and becoming director of the UA Sarver Heart Center, is being honored as one of Tu Nidito's Remarkable Moms.


Running at Dawn: A Diné Cultural and Health Teaching

04/22/2019

Ariel Shirley, a graduating senior at the University of Arizona Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health who completed an internship focused on community education at the UA Sarver Heart Center, writes about the importance of running in the Diné (Navajo) culture.


Unintentional Bias by Doctors

03/29/2019

Even people who believe they're blind to another person's color carry unintentional bias. Dr. Khadijah Breathett gives advice to doctors who want to be aware of their biases and how to overcome these.


Using a Patient’s Own Cells in Regenerative Medicine Therapies

01/03/2019

Jared Churko, PhD, assistant professor, Cellular and Molecular Medicine, spoke with Leslie Tolbert, PhD, regents professor emerita, Neuroscience at the University of Arizona, about using iPS cells to study patient-specific diseases, test drugs most likely to work on a given patient, and even replace diseased tissues.


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